Craniosacral Therapy for Pelvic Pain

If you are pregnant, the chances are high that you are experiencing pelvic pain. This can be an uncomfortable experience.

Craniosacral Therapy for Pelvic Pain

Up to 30% of pregnant women experience pelvic pain. When pelvic pain is experienced by a pregnant woman, it is often referred to as Pelvic Girdle Pain (PGP). There are many different ways of treating this condition during pregnancy, including:

  1. Standard care with medication

  2. A combination of standard care plus holistic and natural treatments

  3. Holistic and natural treatments

Considering these three different options, a study was conducted using craniosacral therapy as the holistic treatment to investigate the effectiveness of craniosacral therapy in treating pregnant women with pelvic pain.

A Case Study and Pelvic Pain

A study was completed by the Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology . The study had the following parameters:

Type: The study was a randomized, multicenter, single-blind, controlled trial.

Location: The study was conducted throughout Gothenburg, Sweden — a university hospital, in a private clinic, and 26 maternity care centers.

Participants: 123 women who were pregnant and diagnosed with Pelvic Girdle Pain (PGP)

Groupings: The 123 participants were placed into two groups. The first group had 60 participants who received standard care. The second group had 63 participants who received a combination of standard care and craniosacral therapy.

How Effective is Craniosacral Therapy for Pelvic Pain?

To find out how effective craniosacral therapy is for pelvic pain, let’s look at the results of the study:

Decreased pain: The participants in the group receiving craniosacral therapy reported experiencing lower levels of pelvic pain compared to the group receiving only standard care.

Research: The study concluded that more studies should be conducted to find out more about the effectiveness of craniosacral therapy. However, it can be an effective and useful holistic treatment option for many.

How Many Sessions Will I Need?

The number of sessions that you will need is dependent upon your:

1. Quality of life

2. Intensity of pain

A craniosacral therapy practitioner will help you create and implement a treatment plan for your health needs and well being during your pregnancy. You may experience progress with your symptoms of pelvic pain after one session of craniosacral therapy. You may also find that three to ten sessions are needed.

Cost

The average price per session in the United States is $70-$170. Prenatal experience is essential when using craniosacral therapy for pregnancy. For more information, read: How Much Does Craniosacral Therapy Cost?

Find a Craniosacral Therapist near you

There are hundreds of talented craniosacral therapists on DaoCloud:

Atlanta, GA • Austin, TX • Baltimore, MD • Boston, MA • Boulder, CO • Buffalo, NY • Charleston, SC • Charlotte, NC • Chicago, IL • Cincinatti, OH • Cleveland, OH • Columbus, OH • Dallas, TX • Denver, CO • Detroit, MI • Houston, TX • Indianapolis, IN • Kansas City, MO • Las Vegas, NV • Los Angeles, CA • Miami, FL • Minneapolis, MN • New York, NY • Orlando, FL • Philadelphia, PA • Phoenix, AZ • Pittsburg, PA • Portland, OR • Raleigh, NC • Salt Lake City, UT • San Antonio, TX • San Diego, CA • San Francisco, CA • San Jose, CA • Seattle, WA • St. Louis, MO • Tampa, FL • Tucson, AZ • Washington, DC 

References:

Applications of CranioSacral Therapy in Newborns and ... (n.d.). Retrieved April 4, 2019, from https://www.iahe.com/docs/articles/massagetoday.com-applications-of-craniosacral-therapy-in-newborns-and-infants-part-i-1511268210.pdf

Elden, H., Östgaard, H., Glantz, A., Marciniak, P., Linnér, A., & Olsén, M. F. (2013). Effects of craniosacral therapy as adjunct to standard treatment for pelvic girdle pain in pregnant women: A multicenter, single-blind, randomized controlled trial. Acta Obstetricia Et Gynecologica Scandinavica, 92(7), 775-782. doi:10.1111/aogs.12096. Retrieved April 7, 2019, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23369067