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How does someone mentally and emotionally get through a pandemic?

Asked 6/26/2020 14:45 by Kat Kohler Schwartz, Professional Core Alignment Mentor
Kat Kohler Schwartz

Kat Kohler Schwartz

Answered 6/26/2020 14:57

A major contributing factor to being healthy is our mental outlook on life. Do we socialize? Are we frequently angry or sad or fearful? Negative emotions attach to our overall wellbeing. The firing neurons in our brain slow down, also slowing our immune system. Changing our outlook to life is key to building our immune system back up. How do we achieve this? Through methodical approaches that probe into our emotions to find out where they started and how they are still occuring. And, through re-programming the emotions to face challenges more easily - again leading to an overall better wellbeing. I practice NeuroLinguistic Programming and Emotional Wisdom Training that has become the science-backed and artful practice of coaching. I invite you to try it out and see if it works for you. Make an appointment with me and I will work with you with kindness, friendliness, and curiosity. [email protected]

Kat Kohler Schwartz

Kat Kohler Schwartz

Answered 6/26/2020 16:20

A major contributing factor to being healthy is our mental outlook on life. Do we socialize? Are we frequently angry or sad or fearful? Negative emotions attach to our overall wellbeing. The firing neurons in our brain slow down, also slowing our immune system. Changing our outlook to life is key to building our immune system back up. How do we achieve this? Through methodical approaches that probe into our emotions to find out where they started and how they are still occuring. And, through re-programming the emotions to face challenges more easily - again leading to an overall better wellbeing. I practice NeuroLinguistic Programming and Emotional Wisdom Training that has become the science-backed and artful practice of coaching. I invite you to try it out and see if it works for you. Make an appointment with me and I will work with you with kindness, friendliness, and curiosity. [email protected]

The body and mind are connected so increasing physical activity can often contribute to a stronger emotional and mental outlook. It is natural to feel anxiety and fear in the midst of a pandemic. Taking time to be quiet and concentrate on your breathing can also lead to a more relaxed state. Doing exercises such as yoga, Qi Gong or T'ai Chi can also contribute to your mental and emotional wellbeing. In addition, acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine provide improvement in your energy which impacts your ability to cope in this pandemic. I invite you to explore these various modalities for a stronger you, both physically and mentally.

Nini S Castle

Nini S Castle

Answered 7/19/2020 04:03

This has been a big one as the pandemic has shaken our comfort zones to pieces. When we take ownership of our experience, and understand that when our internal strength is strong, we depend less on our externals and look for ways to find success. If someone lacks self confidence, it doesn't matter what anyone else says, they feel weak inside, but when he/she believes in possibilities and the ability to carry it forth, he/she manifests positive results. As a multidimensional Clairvoyant healer, I help my clients with this process, and watch them receive abundance

Nini S Castle

Nini S Castle

Answered 7/19/2020 13:45

This has been a big one as the pandemic has shaken our comfort zones to pieces. When we take ownership of our experience, and understand that when our internal strength is strong, we depend less on our externals and look for ways to find success. If someone lacks self confidence, it doesn't matter what anyone else says, they feel weak inside, but when he/she believes in possibilities and the ability to carry it forth, he/she manifests positive results. As a multidimensional Clairvoyant healer, I help my clients with this process, and watch them receive abundance. Feel free to reach out to me directly

Natalie Kohlhaas MA LPC NBCC CPCS C.Ht

Each person reaches for their own form of resilience. There is no right or wrong way to find your own sense of ease as long as it sustains your needs. For some, it is a sense of connection, for others' creativity or accomplishment. Look to provide structure to your week where you spend time in purpose, enjoyment, physical activity, connected to others, creativity, nurturing, and accomplishment. All of these allow ourselves to reach for resilience whether in a pandemic or the mundane. The way we go about obtaining these may change, but the sense of structure for self remains the same.

Beata Maslanka, L.OM, MSTOM

Beata Maslanka, L.OM, MSTOM

Answered 8/3/2020 14:24

Hi, my answer is we do get through it. Sometime the road is rocky and painful, full of anxiety and fear. I found reaching out for informations and making my own conclusion makes be fear less and and I become less anxious. See where your level of anxiety and fear is and if you are able to reason with yourself or do you need help? I have developed practices to feel centered. I do exercise and eat well as often as I can. Now I am taking local excursions. The nature calms me down. Connecting with friends and making new friends gives me joy and can be fun.

Kia Sanford MS

Kia Sanford MS

Answered 8/4/2020 23:52

Forest bathing... a practice known in Japan as shinrin-yoku. Get outside, away from people if you can, away from the news feeds, and away from technology (yes, turn off your phone). Specifically, get out and breathe deeply among the trees. It makes sense on so many levels including the simple exchange between humans who exhale what plants need -- carbon dioxide -- and plants and trees which exhale what we need -- oxygen. In addition, plants and trees influence their environments by releasing substances in the air around them that can be beneficial for us. For example, pine trees release phytoncides which have antibiotic activity in the area surrounding them. A walk through the forest (or even a local park), even for just 20 minutes, can relieve stress as well as contribute to your resilience!

Naranjan Nota

Naranjan Nota

Answered 8/17/2020 15:32

Observation and more centre in oneself! Do an audit of life, what's working, what can be changed and how you can step into your power and live a life you're proud of. The messages signs will continue to let loud; we are all given the gift of reflection; it's time to recognize it and take action, yes, it's scary yet; it something that necessary.

Lynne Stylianou-Jensen, MA

Lynne Stylianou-Jensen, MA

Answered 8/20/2020 22:39

This is a difficult time for all of us. There are many good answers here from all of of the caregivers. What I can contribute is how important it is to take care of your self during this time. Stress and worry around the pandemic can lower the immune system. The good news is you can choose to turn that around. You can learn to respond to stress instead of react. Though the art of coaching I teach an evidence-based skillset that will allow you to come into a state of balanced alignment , that will give you many benefits including a stronger immune system. This is a powerful healing modality that has worked for me for more than 20 years. If you would like to learn more I'd like to invite you to contact me: [email protected]

Susan Petang

Susan Petang

Answered 8/21/2020 16:46

My real answer is too long to post here. :-) 3 Key Points: 1. Be mindful. Stay in THIS moment, right now. The past is gone, the future isn't here yet. The only thing that is real (and logical to embrace and enhance) is NOW. 2. Be grateful & positive. Not just for big things, but for little things, too. "I"m grateful I got to sleep an extra 10 minutes this morning." I'm grateful I got the shopping done so quickly." When we do that regularly, the feeling of gratitude becomes familiar - and we'll see all the everyday miracles we usually miss. 3. Monitor your self talk. What do you tell yourself about the pandemic? "This is awful and what will I do if I get sick?" Instead, say things like, "I've dealt with serious problems before. I'll do the best I can and am able to handle anything that comes my way." Maybe this free YouTube video will be helpful: "5 Ways for Moms to Deal with Lockdown Stress (without a hand grenade)" https://youtu.be/r7P7fOuiDRA Visit www.thequietzonecoaching.com for more info. :-)

Alicia Love

Alicia Love

Answered 9/14/2020 22:11

This is a time of developing resiliency. Focus on each present moment with a gentile kindness towards yourself. Meditate on what you are grateful for and stay in connection with yourself (emotions) and others (friends and family). Get enough exercise and reach for healthy alternatives like herbs and essential oils to support your nervous system.

Mary Rosenquist, CH

Mary Rosenquist, CH

Answered 9/15/2020 18:54

Show gratitude for all the positive things that still remain. It may require a change of focus, as things you take for granted normally go unnoticed such as a roof over your head, a warm bed at night, plenty of food to eat and people that love you. Also, spend time in nature, it will clear your mind. Remeber that everything has a beginning, middle and end.